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FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Question Shortcuts:
Do the books meet the National Curriculum Requirements?
What are the aims of the Reading Record and Learning Tools? 
What are the objectives of the Reading Record and Learning Tools? 
What is the difference between the Log Format and Diary Format?
How should I use the Reading Record Booklets? 
What length of time is required for each tool?
You have aimed the booklets as a Home-school link. How should I engage the parents?
Characteristics of Assessment for Learning (AfL)
Can I suggest changes for future releases?


Questions and Answers:

Do the books meet the National Curriculum?
Yes, the Learning Tools in the Log Format and the Diary Format  are mapped to the attainment targets within the Language and Literacy part of the  National Curriculum and the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. We have also included  letter sounds by phases, decodable and common words and words list. For detailed mapping reference, please look at the Teachers Guide.

What are the aims of the Reading Record and Learning Tools?
 
- Develop confident independent readers and fluent writers.
- To bring together the skills of reading, writing and comprehension.
- To move the child beyond the technical operation of reading and to grasp the meaning of the text.

 
What are the objectives of the Reading Record and Learning Tools? 

- To maintain a record of the books being read from the Reading Scheme books and free choice books.
- To elicit responses from the text through the Learning Tools. The tools encourage the child to reflect and apply their ideas.
- To promote motivation and reward through three levels of certificates that are linked to the Learning Tools and agreed targets.

What is the difference between the Log Format and Diary Format?
The Log Format has predefined spaces that give a 'voice' to the child, parent and teacher. The Diary Format has free form columns and is open ended. Both formats incorporate Learning Tools. The EYFS, Year 1 and Year 2 books have sounds by phases,  decodable and common words and other supporting activities.

How should I use the Reading Record Booklets?

The booklets are to be used as a home-school link to maintain a log of the books being read. The Learning Tools are interspersed between the pages. The teacher directs the child or the class to complete particular Learning Tools. 
The teacher needs to decide at the beginning of each term how many tools the children need to complete before certificates are awarded. A special award has been incorporated in the Blue book - the Headteacher's award. This acknowledges the commitment and dedication given to both the reading and the completion of the tools and it also sets out targets for children to take to their secondary school.
At Key Stage 1, the Green, Red and Purple booklets can be used to log books read from both the Reading Scheme books and free choice books.

What length of time is required for each tool? 

Some tools take a few minutes to complete, whilst others can be paced out over a week or more.

You have aimed the booklets as a home-school link. How should I engage the parents? 

Organise an introductory session with parents/carer to explain the book format and use this forum to set out your expectations, commitment to listening to their children read and the mechanism on how to use the booklets to provide feedback. The Teacher Guide contains a model letter and suggestions for engaging parents. 

The key messages are:

1. The booklet is a shared three way partnership between the child, parent and teacher.
2. Children should be reading for meaning and the importance of expressing and articulating the text through written and spoken word. 3. The importance of the Learning Tools in bringing together the skills of reading, writing and comprehension.

Schools often have to work hard to develop relationships and use collaborative approaches with parents. Where this is effectively managed, the children come into the classroom, having read and discussed the text and perhaps shared broader experiences with the parent. The winners in this process are both the child and the teacher. The teacher can now work at a different level, consolidate gaps and reinforce concepts. We have read many times on End of Year Reports, of the invaluable contribution from parents and how this has shaped the child's learning. Parents greatly appreciate respect shown towards their contribution to their child's work.

The Teacher's Guide has plenty of tips on how to further the home-school link.


Characteristics of Assessment for Learning (AfL) 

Effective assessment for learning happens all the time in the classroom. It involves: 
- sharing learning goals with pupils 
- helping pupils know and recognise the standards to aim for 
- providing feedback that helps pupils to identify how to improve 
- believing that every pupil can improve in comparison with previous achievements 
- both the teacher and pupils reviewing and reflecting on pupils' performance and progress 
- pupils learning self-assessment techniques to discover areas they need to improve 
- recognising that both motivation and self-esteem, crucial for effective learning and progress, can be increased by effective assessment techniques.

If your school is currently using a card or a book to log the number of books being read then the assessment for this generally follows the format that the teacher reviews comments, responds and signs.


Can I suggest changes for future releases? 

Certainly, the current version has been driven by Literacy Co-ordinators from a number of schools.
We value feedback and will endeavour to meet your needs.
Email your views to customerservice@jellyjames.co.uk 

Frequently Asked Questions Tel: 0203 113 2066